Assumptions of radiometric dating dating2019 ru

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Does radiometric dating provide the desperately needed 'proof' that evolutionists have long been searching for? In order to correctly understand the issue, you must come to an understanding of the process or mechanics behind the idea of radiometric dating.There are several methods used, but in this small article, only two will be examined: - The Uranium-Thorium-Lead method - And the Potassium-Argon method Each of these methods rely upon the common fact that the parent component in a system (e.g., uranium) will gradually 'decay' into the daughter component (e.g., lead).For example, in the The decay constant has dimensions of reciprocal seconds.In the special case in which parent and daughter atoms are present in equal quantities, the age of the specimen is the half-life of the parent isotope: The first assumption, that the amount of the daughter isotope in the original rock is known, is the weakest assumption.The process is unhindered in development, it is separate from outside factors. If it were changed, then any calculation of the earth's age or the sample's age would be incorrect. The idea that a system in nature could remain closed (that is, not influenced by any outside sources) for millions or billions of years is absurd to the highest degree. Is it possible to know the original components of a system formed billions of years ago?b.) Not have any of the daughter components present in the initial system. If there existed any of the daughter components in the original system, you would have to know that amount and incorporate it into your calculations. To obtain a proper date, you would need to compensate for the fluctuating process rate. Is there such a thing in nature as a closed system? According to evolutionists, there were no humans around during that time, so the notion that we can know the original components is once again absurd. What process rate in an open system remains unchanged?

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The numbers 238 and 206 represent these isotopes' atomic mass.To gain an index of time since the original formation of the system, you document the relative proportions of the two components.Therefore, based on the certain amounts of the components in a sample, you can tell how old the sample is.This is all seemingly fine until you evaluate the assumptions that this system is built upon.In order for the radiometric dating system to be accurate, the system would: a.) Need to be a closed system. That is, that the process was not or is not affected by any outside or inside influences. Since the establishment of the system, the decay or process rate has remained stable and unchanged.By measuring how long it takes for an unstable element to decay into a stable element and by measuring how much daughter element has been produced by the parent element within a specimen of rock, scientists believe they are able to determine the age of the rock.This belief is based upon three significant assumptions.Other methods such as Potassium-argon dating and Isochron dating are based on faulty assumptions and so unreliable as to be useless.Many atoms (or elements) exist as numerous varieties called isotopes, some of which are radioactive, meaning they decay over time by losing particles."In a billion years [from now], it seems, intelligent life might be as different from humans as humans are from insects . To change from a human being to a cloud may seem a big order, but it's the kind of change you'd expect over billions of years." Freeman Dyson, Statement made in 1986, quoted in Asimov's Book of Science and Nature Quotations, p. [American mathematician.]"Slowness has really nothing to do with the question.An event is not any more intrinsically intelligible or unintelligible because of the pace at which it moves.

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