Non sedating antihistamines for allergic rhinitis

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An essentially non-sedating oral medicinal formulation consisting essentially of: an antihistaminic agent which is limited in both sedating and anticholinergic properties in relation to sedating first-generation antihistamines, an anticholinergic agent, and a nasal decongestant.6.A method of treating allergic rhinitis in a patient suffering therefrom, said method comprising: (i) providing an essentially non-sedating oral medicinal formulation consisting essentially of: (a) an antihistaminic agent limited in both sedating and anticholinergic properties in comparison with sedating first-generation antihistamines, (b) an anticholinergic agent, and (c) a nasal decongestant, and (ii) administering said formulation to said patient in need thereof. Field of the Invention Unrelated to their function of binding to H1 histamine receptors, the first-generation antihistamines produce sedation, an unwanted side effect, but also provide anticholinergic effects, which are helpful for reducing secretions and controlling rhinorrhea.Treatment is most effectively given by an allergist who is certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.

In school-age children, this may be a major disadvantage. Seasonal allergic rhinitis and antihistamine effect on children's learning.Because it is almost impossible to completely avoid exposure to allergens, oral antihistamines continue to serve as the first line pharmacological treatment for allergic rhinitis.Oral antihistamines available on the market are classified into two groups; first-generation (sedating) and second-generation (non-sedating) antihistamines." April 25, 2003 -- Timely research for the start of hay fever season: Despite their higher cost, the newer, so-called "second generation" of more expensive "nonsedating" prescription antihistamines may be no more effective at preventing fatigue and memory lapses than older over-the-counter formulas such as Benadryl.So concludes a new study published in the current issue of Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in which researchers compared 18 previous trials investigating antihistamine-caused sedation levels in 1,500 people between ages 8 and 81.Second-generation antihistamines, which are relatively nonsedating, have been developed but are lacking in anticholinergic efficacy.Despite the abundance of presently marketed formulations for addressing the symptoms for allergic rhinitis, no medicinal formulation is presently available which provides both antihistaminic and anticholinergic actions in an essentially nonsedating manner. The State of the Art Allergic rhinitis refers to a common inflammatory condition of the nose caused by allergies and affects at least 15% of the United States population.This content has not been reviewed within the past year and may not represent Web MD's most up-to-date information.To find the most current information, please enter your topic of interest into our search box.Patients should be advised to avoid known allergens and be educated about their condition.Intranasal corticosteroids are the most effective treatment and should be first-line therapy for mild to moderate disease.

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