Typology dating archaeology

Seriation is a standard method of dating in archaeology.

Jørgensen 1992; Two different variants of seriation have been applied: contextual seriation and frequency seriation (Renfrew and Bahn 1996, pp. Whereas contextual seriation is based on the presence or absence of a design style, frequency seriation relies on measuring the proportional abundance or frequency of a design style.

An example are assemblages of pottery sherds each including roughly the same range of types though in different proportions.

Flinders Petrie excavated at Diospolis Parva in Egypt in the late nineteenth century.

He assumed that the change in styles was an evolutionary one, and, if you could quantify that change, he surmised it might be used to indicate which cemeteries were older than others.

Petrie's notions about Egyptology, and archaeology in general, were revolutionary.

The seriation method works because object styles change over time; they always have and always will.

A good example of a change in artifact type is the development of hand-held PDAs from those first enormous cell phones. As an example of how change through time works, consider the different music recording methods that were used in the 20th century.

Within the Law of Moses, many sacrifices, offerings and rituals were prescribed by God as the worship to be given by Israel.

These sacrifices pointed forward, in different ways, to the one Sacrifice to be offered on the Cross for the sins of all God's people.

Contextual seriation is often used for reconstructing the chronological sequence of graves as only the presence or absence of a design style or type is important.

Frequency seriation is applied in case of large quantities of objects belonging to the same style.

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